Tag Archive tutorial

Gimp Beginner – Straight Line, Circle

This tutorial shows you how you can create straight lines and circles with GIMP. Using the shift key a straight line can be drawn, instead of relying on the imprecision of the mouse. A perfect circle can be drawn by setting the aspect ratio of an ellipse.

  1. Lets start by creating a new file. Open up Gimp, A window titled GNU Manipulation Program as seen below should pop up.
    Gimp - GNU Manipulation Program
  2. In the upper left hand corner click on File then New… The following window appears.
    Gimp - Create New image
    I just left the settings at 640×480 pixels because that should be all we need for this tutorial, if you plan on making something more high resolution or of different dimensions you can adjust these settings. Click OK and you will have your work space.
  3. To draw a straight line click on the pencil Icon in the toolbox, place the pointer over the white surface and place a dot where desired.
    Gimp - Toolbox Tool Options Pencil
    Gimp - Workspace Pencil
  4. After placing the dot move your cursor to the desired end point, hold shift and click to place a line.
    Gimp - Workspace Draw Line
  5. The thickness and different effects for line creation can be adjusted in the “tool options” Pane on the left hand side located in the tool box. See how adjusting the thickness to 7 made a thinner line?
    Gimp - Toolbox Tool Options Pencil
    Gimp - Workspace Line Thickness
  6. Now to create a perfect circle! Instead of having the pencil selected, you’ll want to change to the ellipse select tool in the toolbox. To make it a perfect circle, in the tool options part of the toolbox you’ll want to check fixed aspect ratio.
    Gimp - Toolbox Tool Options Ellipse
    Gimp - Toolbox Tool Options Circle
  7. Click and drag in your drawing area until you create a circle of the desired size, and release the mouse button.
    Gimp - Workspace Draw Circle
  8. You should be left with a moving dotted line marking where your circle will be.
    To fill the circle with color, leave the circle selected and go up to the top row and choose Select, then choose selection editor.
    Gimp - Workspace Fill Circle
  9. After opening the selection editor you’ll want to select the paintbrush in the lower right hand corner.
    Gimp - Workspace Fill Circle Paint Brush
  10. After opening the choose stroke style window you may adjust the settings which will adjust thickness, color, style and other more advanced options. Click stroke to draw your circle.
    Gimp - Workspace Paint Brush Stroke Style
  11. Exit out of the selection editor and click outside of your circle to deselect it, and you have your circle!
    Gimp - Workspace Paint Brush Stroke Style Circle

A straight line, a circle, hey no problem and you thought this was going to be as painful as going to the dentist.

Gimp Beginner – Complex Shapes

This tutorial shows you how you can create filled squares, circles and free form complex shapes with GIMP. Using the toolbox options we can control whether we have a rectangle or square and similarly an ellipse or circle. The toolbox also helps us pick the fill color for any shape.

  1. Lets start by creating a new file. Open up Gimp, A window titled GNU Manipulation Program as seen below should pop up.
    Gimp - GNU Manipulation Program
  2. In the upper left hand corner click on File then New… The following window appears.
    Gimp - Create New image
    I changed the settings from 640×400 to 800×800 to have a larger work surface. If you plan on making something more high resolution or of different dimensions you can adjust these settings. Click OK and you will have your work space.
  3. We’ll start by drawing a solid square and a solid circle. To start with a square you’ll need to select the “rectangular select tool” as seen below.
    Gimp - Toolbox tool options rectangle
  4. If you would like to draw a perfect square select the check box marked “fixed aspect ratio” in the toolbox tool options further down where the tap labeled “tool options” is located.
    Gimp - Toolbox tool options square
  5. Click and drag the left mouse button to create a square of the size you desire, you may also uncheck the “fixed aspect ratio” box to create a rectangular shape.
    Gimp - Workspace draw square
  6. To fill in the selected rectangle or square click on the “bucket fill tool” as seen below in the toolbox.
    Gimp - Toolbox tool options fill.
    You may select the color you wish to paint your square by clicking on the large black box located on the bottom of this image or the middle of the toolbox.
  7. After you have selected your color you may now fill in your shape, click once with the paint bucket inside of your square selection to fill it with color.
    Gimp - Workspace draw square and fill.
    To deselect, click on the “rectangular select tool” once more and click outside of your square in the white area once to deselect the square.
  8. To draw a circle repeat the technique learned above but instead of using the “rectangular select tool” use the “ellipse select tool” as shown. Be sure to check “fixed aspect ratio” if you desire a perfect circle.
    Gimp - Toolbox tool options bucket fill.
    Now we have a circle and a square.
    Gimp - Workspace fill circle and square.
  9. Now let’s draw something a little more complex, a horseshoe shape, just for demonstration’s sake. To begin select the “free select tool”.
    Gimp - Toolbox tool options free form select.
  10. Begin drawing your desired shape. To get a straight line click once and release, and move your mouse to the desired next point. To get a free form line click and drag the mouse in the desired pattern, when you’ve outlined everything click back on the starting point to select the shape.
    Gimp - Workspace draw free form.
    I used a combination of straight and free form lines to create a horse shoe shape, where the lines look less neat is where the freeform was. Which is a problem with free drawing with a computer mouse, it’s not very accurate and it’s very easy to make mistakes.
  11. Let’s finish by filling the horseshoe in with the same techniques we used to fill the square and circle. With the “bucket fill tool”.
    Gimp - Toolbox tool options bucket fill.
  12. Select a color by clicking the black box on the bottom of this example or in the middle of the toolbar and selecting a color. Then, using the “bucket fill tool” fill it in with the desired color.
    Gimp - Workspace fill circle, square and free form.
    To remove the selection click on the “free select tool” and click outside of your selection.

Complex shapes are now just childs play once you see how easy they are to do.

Gimp Beginner – Red Eye Removal

This tutorial shows you how easy red eye removal is using GIMP (Gimp – Open source image retouching and editing tool.). Red eye removal is so simple, it is just a matter of selecting the right filter.

  1. First we need to locate a picture to remove red eye from. Do this by opening the picture with the red eye by: Go to File then Open…
    Gimp - Open file menu.
  2. Locate the file you need to correct, In my case it was located on the desktop, click “open”.
    Gimp Select image to open.
  3. Now you have your Red eye image that needs to be corrected. Now, to get down to business, getting rid of those demonic eyes. To do this go to Filters, then enhance, then select “Red eye removal…”
    Gimp - Selecting Red Eye Removal from enhanced filters menu.
  4. After opening this, you should immediately get the following window with options to remove your red eye.
    Gimp - Red eye removal preview.
  5. Adjusting the threshold slider will give you different color ranges and results. For us, using around 50 seems to do the trick without altering our color too much. Click “ok” to apply the filter.
    Gimp - Red eye removal preview with low threshold.
    Gimp - Red eye removal preview with high threshold.
    Gimp - Red eye removal preview with medium threshold.
  6. See how the red eye is removed? That’s what we’re aiming for, normal blue eyes without any red lasers shooting out of them.
    Gimp - Red eye removal filter applied.

Wow that was easy, even a tennager can do it. Oh right, your teenager already knows how and now so do you.

Quicktime

Learn how to install and setup the QuickTime Player with this tutorial. The player is a free multimedia player. You can use it to view many kinds of files, including video, audio, still images, graphics, and virtual reality (VR) movies. QuickTime supports the most popular formats on the Internet for news, sports, education, movie trailers, and other entertainment. QuickTime is also a multimedia architecture that other applications can leverage. Some of the most popular software—such as iTunes, iMovie, and Final Cut Pro from Apple, as well as many third-party programs—uses the QuickTime architecture for important multimedia functions. These applications require QuickTime to be installed in order to function properly.

A powerful multimedia technology with a built-in media player, the player lets you view Internet video, HD movie trailers, and personal media in a wide range of file formats. And it lets you enjoy them in remarkably high quality. With its simple design and easy-to-use controls, the player makes everything you watch even more enjoyable. Its clean, uncluttered interface never gets in the way of what you’re watching. Want to speed through a movie or slow things down? A handy slider lets you set playback from 1/2x to 3x the normal speed. And you can search through individual movie frames quickly.

Video from your digital camera or mobile phone. A movie on your Mac or PC. A media clip on a website. No matter what you’re watching or where you’re watching it, QuickTime technology makes it all possible. The player features advanced video compression technology called H.264 to deliver brilliant, crisp HD video using less bandwidth and storage. So you’ll experience pristine video quality wherever you watch your movies or videos.

Please note this is an outdated tutorial and it will be replaced soon.